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Umbraco Back-office Authentication With Azure Active Directory

There's a fair bit of information a Google search away about configuring Umbraco back-office authentation with providers such as Azure Active Directory, but things change, information gets outdated or doesn't quite apply - so mostly as a note to self, but maybe useful if anyone comes across it, here's a few notes and links I've used in setting this up at the end of 2020 and Umbraco 8.8. First step was to follow the instructions in Shannon's blog post found here , to create an application registration in Azure AD and install the necessary NuGet packages into the Umbraco website project. Having done this, and signed in as normal using the default administrator account, there's an option to link the account with Azure AD. First time I tried that, I got the error: Error: "OpenIdConnectMessage.Error was not null, indicating an error. Error: 'unsupported_response_type'. Error_Description (may be empty): 'AADSTS700054: response_type 'id_token
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Six-months as part of the Umbraco .NET Core Transition team

Cross-posting an article written for my company's blog, on my experiences as part of the Umbraco .NET Core transition team .

SOLID: Dependency Inversion Principle

About 5 years ago, I wrote a series of short articles on the SOLID principles, shared by email to my colleagues as a weekly, Monday morning read. They were then archived for reference to our internal knowledge base. That's getting a revamp and re-platforming now, and given their age, I'm not sure these pieces will be making the cut. Given it's fairly timeless stuff, seems a shame for them to disappear into the virtual ether, so I'll save them for posterity here. The SOLID Principles The SOLID principles are a well established set of tenets intended to guide software design toward a maintainable solution. They are widely applicable and operate at a high level, so are well worth considering for almost any type of application we are looking to build, using any framework or language. For the full set of articles in the series, see: S is for Single Responsibility Principle O is for Open/Closed Principle L is for Liskov Substitution Principle I is for I

SOLID: Interface Segregation Principle

About 5 years ago, I wrote a series of short articles on the SOLID principles, shared by email to my colleagues as a weekly, Monday morning read. They were then archived for reference to our internal knowledge base. That's getting a revamp and re-platforming now, and given their age, I'm not sure these pieces will be making the cut. Given it's fairly timeless stuff, seems a shame for them to disappear into the virtual ether, so I'll save them for posterity here. The SOLID Principles The SOLID principles are a well established set of tenets intended to guide software design toward a maintainable solution. They are widely applicable and operate at a high level, so are well worth considering for almost any type of application we are looking to build, using any framework or language. For the full set of articles in the series, see: S is for Single Responsibility Principle O is for Open/Closed Principle L is for Liskov Substitution Principle I is for I

SOLID: Liskov Substitution Principle

About 5 years ago, I wrote a series of short articles on the SOLID principles, shared by email to my colleagues as a weekly, Monday morning read. They were then archived for reference to our internal knowledge base. That's getting a revamp and re-platforming now, and given their age, I'm not sure these pieces will be making the cut. Given it's fairly timeless stuff, seems a shame for them to disappear into the virtual ether, so I'll save them for posterity here. The SOLID Principles The SOLID principles are a well established set of tenets intended to guide software design toward a maintainable solution. They are widely applicable and operate at a high level, so are well worth considering for almost any type of application we are looking to build, using any framework or language. For the full set of articles in the series, see: S is for Single Responsibility Principle O is for Open/Closed Principle L is for Liskov Substitution Principle I is for I